Summer at Getty Museum



Getty Museum, one of the most beautiful cultural spots in Los Angeles.

Beautiful six-building complex designed by Richard Meier in 1997.

Getty's collection includes European paintings, drawings, various sculpture, manuscripts and photographs.


Portrait of a Young Man in Red

Circle of Raphael (Raffaello Sanzio)

Italian painter 1483- 1520

An unknown man, cool and contained, stands proudly in front of a prosperous landscape that may include a portrait of his own residence. The fine yet restrained clothes, direct gaze, and proud bearing characterize the new Renaissance emphasis on individualism. The three-quarter turn of the body, with his arm forming the base of the triangular composition, became a popular pose in that era; not incidentally, it draws attention to the man's ring and the fine Middle Eastern carpet covering the table.


The Apostle Simon

Anthony van Dyck

Flemish artist 1599-1641

nspired by a series of apostles that Rubens painted in 1610 for the Duke of Lerma, Spain's chief minister, Anthony van Dyck set about making his own similar series, including this painting of the Apostle Simon. Simon is shown bust-length, his head turned so that his profile is "lost" or partially obscured by shadow. His left hand rests on a saw, the instrument of his martyrdom. Light falls from the top left, creating highlights and deep shadows across his head, face, hand, and clothing. Draperies are broadly painted and richly colored, while the apostle's hair, eyebrows, and beard are finely painted to convey their wavy, silky texture.


A Young Scholar and his Tutor

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijan

Dutch painter 1606-1699

An elderly man in a subdued green velvet cloak trimmed in fur instructs a boy wearing a lavish Eastern costume. The artist presents a study in contrasts: the student's youthfulness, his smooth complexion, lavish garments, and quest for knowledge are balanced against the learned man's aged, weathered face as he imparts wisdom. A warm light that accentuates the tonal contrasts and rich textures of the velvet and satin fabrics bathes the two figures. Light catches and shimmers off the precious stones of the boy's gold jewelry. Fine, precise brushstrokes enhance the overall impression of softness. The subjects are presented in the guise of historical personages, possibly portraying the youthful Old Testament prophet Samuel with his instructor Eli. The use of lavish costumes and light and dark contrasts reveal the influence of Rembrandt.An elderly man in a subdued green velvet cloak trimmed in fur instructs a boy wearing a lavish Eastern costume. The artist presents a study in contrasts: the student's youthfulness, his smooth complexion, lavish garments, and quest for knowledge are balanced against the learned man's aged, weathered face as he imparts wisdom. A warm light that accentuates the tonal contrasts and rich textures of the velvet and satin fabrics bathes the two figures. Light catches and shimmers off the precious stones of the boy's gold jewelry. Fine, precise brushstrokes enhance the overall impression of softness. The subjects are presented in the guise of historical personages, possibly portraying the youthful Old Testament prophet Samuel with his instructor Eli. The use of lavish costumes and light and dark contrasts reveal the influence of Rembrandt.


Bullfight, Suerte de Varas

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (Francisco de Goya)

Spanish painter, 1746 - 1828

Before a mesmerized crowd, man and beast dramatically confront one another. The fiercely determined picadorleans forward and gathers all his strength, readying himself to stab the impassive bull with his sharp lance. Dying or wounded animals lie on the ground, and the bloody undersides of the picador's horse convey the abusive and violent aspects of the sport of bullfighting. The bull coolly eyes his opponent as a group of fearful men try to distract the savage animal. Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes painted this work late in his career when he had begun experimenting with different techniques. Showing remarkable freedom, Goya used a heavily loaded brush, a palette knife, a rag, and even his fingers to apply paint to the canvas. Thick black strokes of paint suggest tension and movement, while dark shadows and a faceless crowd in the background lend an ominous air to this emotional confrontation.Before a mesmerized crowd, man and beast dramatically confront one another. The fiercely determined picadorleans forward and gathers all his strength, readying himself to stab the impassive bull with his sharp lance. Dying or wounded animals lie on the ground, and the bloody undersides of the picador's horse convey the abusive and violent aspects of the sport of bullfighting. The bull coolly eyes his opponent as a group of fearful men try to distract the savage animal. Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes painted this work late in his career when he had begun experimenting with different techniques. Showing remarkable freedom, Goya used a heavily loaded brush, a palette knife, a rag, and even his fingers to apply paint to the canvas. Thick black strokes of paint suggest tension and movement, while dark shadows and a faceless crowd in the background lend an ominous air to this emotional confrontation.


Jeanne (Spring)

Édouard Manet

French painter, 1832 - 1883

A chic young woman in a day dress with floral accents holds a parasol against a background of exuberant foliage. She looks straight ahead, a picture of poise and detachment even as she seems fully aware of the viewer's admiring gaze. Representing aspiring Parisian actress Jeanne Demarsy as the embodiment of Spring, this portrait debuted at the last major public exhibition of Manet's life, the Paris Salon of 1882. For more than two decades, Manet's paintings were rejected by the Salon or met with controversy; Spring was the most unalloyed success of the artist's Salon career, a career that ended tragically a year later when Manet died of causes related to syphilis. Appealing to critics primarily on account of Jeanne's charm, Spring also showcased Manet's mastery of his medium. The painting exhibits a marvelous range of brushwork, from the thin, delicate floral touches on the dress to the smooth handling of Jeanne's face and the broad, sketch-like strokes of the backdrop. The painting's sensual handling and bright, vibrant palette evoke the pleasures of the season it celebrates. When composing Spring, Manet had in view both the latest fashion trends and old artistic traditions. An avid connoisseur of feminine couture, he pieced together Jeanne's ensemble himself by scouring dressmakers' and milliners' shops. Posing his model in the studio, however, he referred to portrait conventions of the early Italian Renaissance, presenting her half-length, in profile, and against a mass of greenery. More than just an ephemeral "fashion-plate," Manet's archetypal Spring was conceived as a picture for the ages, summarizing his modern epoch through the figure of a beautiful Parisienne.


Dancer

Paolo Troubetzkoy

Italian, 1866 - 1938

Bronze


Artwork description respectfully taken from: http://www.getty.edu/art/collection/

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